Cheap

Social Workers are good with money. I mean really good! Even if there’s no money we still do our job. We are creative. And give everything we have to give when it comes down to our clients who need us.

We are also economical. We do not ask more money than we strictly need. And to be sure what we need we calculate. And calculate again to see if we can make it cheaper. Always on the lookout for the minimum. We don’t want to overcharge!

The limit

Working in this way we are always balancing on the edge. This gives, as you probably will agree, a whole lot of tension and stress. You never know if we can make ends meet next year. Bankruptcy is always just around the corner. It feels like we are always on sale. 

There are limits. That’s how I feel on this. Perhaps not with my social heart but when I put my entrepreneurial hat on, I strongly feel that we hit the limit. We have to set new goals for money, business, and sustainability.

How about your limit? Do you hit the wall?

A good price

The solution we need is to be more clear about the value we deliver. First, we have to take ourselves seriously when it comes down to our value, our outcomes and results. We have to believe that we are Leaders of Change. That we do create impact in the lives of people and in the neighborhood. If we know our value we can put the right number on our price tag.

Note: your value has nothing to do with an hourly rate. An hourly rate is a cold and calculated number. What you do need is the sense of people longing for the solutions we have. The answers we have to problems people and society faces.

A good price is a price that feels good. A price that makes you feel proud of your profession. That’s the price you can sell. If you emit your proud and your love for the job, people will pay this price. Believe me! Clients who are not willing to pay your price are not a good fit. They need something else. And that’s okay.

Perhaps you can take a second to feel this and say it out loud to yourself: “People will pay my price. It’s a good and honest price. If they don’t want to pay it then these are not my clients. And that’s okay.”

A new habit

It’s time that Social Work gets some more meat between the buns. And more money in our wallets. This will evoke more feelings of freedom and increase even more our creativity. This is our path to the innovation of the field. Being aware of your value and getting the right price will make you feel more courageous to discover your playground. Because you have the resources to experiment and make things better. You’ll also have the resources to invest in yourself and your own education.

This is a kind of breaking the habit of being poor. We can do this! Be aware of your value and name your price. That’s all you have to do. Start creating this new habit today. And let me know if I can help you because this is what we do in my Academy. Please share your thoughts below ? ? ?

 

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Showing 10 comments
  • Anna
    Reply

    The low salaries also drive a lot of people away from the profession who would likely make wonderful social workers.

    • Anneke
      Reply

      And that’s so sad Anna. Very, very sad. A wonderful Social Worker deserves a wonderful salary! Thank you for sharing!

  • Disana
    Reply

    The biggest hurdle in my view is changing Social Workers’ attitude towards entrepreneurship. Because of being influenced by social justice norms implying that profiteering is no good may discourage social workers from moving away from the service orientation towards treating their occupation as a business. The work they do is also largely in the areas of social welfare with disadvantaged and vulnerable clients contributing to that attitude. Bear wit me if Anneke’s program provides any insight/guidance into this.

    • Anneke
      Reply

      Hi Disana, thank you for sharing your thoughts! Most of my students agree when we talk about their ‘price tag’ that it should be a good price. But immediately they say: “my clients can not afford that!”. At that moment they see in front of their minds eye the vulnerable, disadvantaged, poor people they have always helped. But then we start talking about creating a business and revenue model that solves this problem. Most times that’s the breakthrough social workers need. We can create models that serves more people on different levels. My program provides guidance in creating a social business model. I’m so glad you asked!

  • Alix
    Reply

    Anneke, again, hitting the nail on the head. I am hoping social entrepreneurship can both help social workers to make what they desire and still be able to provide services to those who may not be able to afford it.

    • Anneke
      Reply

      I share this hope. Thank you Alix!

  • Lynne Boardman
    Reply

    Anneka I live in a state in Australia where the government sponsor a community house to enrol people to home visit people with problems. In other words volunteers. I know people who work as volunteers for up to 20 hours per week, so how are they going to employ people when this service is given for free. Social workers are only employed for child protection or for the disabled. Social workers are being replaced by support worker (cheap) instead of professionally trained people. Also the Australian Association of Social Workers (AASW) do not insist on registration as they do in the UK so anyone can call themselves a social worker. I think it is disgusting as I have worked hard to get a degree and a Masters in this worthy profession. it seems like they only value psychologists, therapist and Occupational Therapist to do the work I was so gainfully employed in. Lynne

    • Anneke
      Reply

      Hi Lynne, thank you for sharing your thoughts. In my country registration is still a free choice. But more and more social workers get their registration. We should be more clear about our value and emphasize that we are well educated professionals. Thank you for pointing this out!

  • Grania
    Reply

    Hie Anneke, i’m so proud to be among professionals “Social workers” who are in environments where resources are diminishing and increasingly complex social problems and still stand for change, keep preaching this gospel of entreprenuership for social workers so that we leave low salaries behind

    • Anneke
      Reply

      Hi Grania, yes, we have to stand for change even when times get rough. That’s something to be proud of for sure! Thank you for your comment.

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